Blair Williams: Pimp Your WordPress Plugin

Published

April 24, 2010

Most WordPress Plugins are little more than small utilities but there are a growing number of them that can dramatically augment the way WordPress behaves or give WordPress advanced new features.

Blair Williams demonstrates an effective way to develop your own platform-modifying plugin (PMP) using a Model View Controller (MVC) approach with some additional tips and tricks learned from coding and supporting two different PMPs.

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Event

WordCamp Orange County 2010 13

Speakers

Blair Williams 3

Tags

development 186
MVC 2
Plugins 109

Language

English 2020

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6 Responses to “Blair Williams: Pimp Your WordPress Plugin”

  1. Blair Williams

    The slides that go along with this presentation can be downloaded from my blog here:

    http://blairwilliams.com/pimp

    Like

  2. R'phael Spindel

    Great talk!

    A very light weight PHP MVC framework advocated by PHP creator’s Rasmus’ which is very much along the lines of the style of quick lightweight MVC you talked about here, as well as workable within WordPress architecture without the conflict issues of extra included libraries is “The no-framework PHP MVC framework” (yes, basically includes), but described very well here:

    http://toys.lerdorf.com/archives/38-The-no-framework-PHP-MVC-framework.html

    (also.. CRUD = Create *Read* Update Delete)

    Like

  3. R'phael Spindel

    Viewers may also want to take a look at Tina MVC for WordPress

    http://www.seeit.org/tina-mvc-for-wordpress/

    Like

  4. R'phael Spindel

    @Blair, at 38:00, you talk about creating a mock test suite for WordPress. There has been a fair amount of work done in that area by John Bintz, in two projects called MockPress and a plug-in called Post Fixtures.

    MockPress:

    http://github.com/johnbintz/mockpress

    WordPress Post Fixtures:

    http://wordpress.org/extend/plugins/post-fixtures/

    Like

  5. Blair Willaims

    R’phael — that is some really interesting information — I’ll definitely take a look at the Tina MVC framework. I have to wonder though if you’d run into versioning issues between plugins if 1 plugin needed version x of Tina and another installed plugin needed version y… That is one reason why I like the self-contained, no-conflict MVC — but I’m definitely going to play around with Tina MVC — it’s a great concept.

    I was unaware of these WP testing frameworks — I’m soooooo excited to start looking at them. That has been one pretty major issue I’ve seen so far with WP Plugin development and if these guys have workable solutions for this it would be awesome…

    Like

  6. Herman Boomsma

    This is a good introduction to using MVC in WordPress plugins. It also covers the basics of MVC itself. His approach is thought-through and usable as a base for a standardized way of implementing MVC in WordPress plugins. I think a standardized approach is important because otherwise MVC wont be of much help when it comes to clarity. Maybe such a standardized way already exists, but I did not find much information on the subject until I found this video.

    Like

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