Scott Rosenberg: WordPress – A Key Link in Blogging’s Evolutionary Chain

Published

May 1, 2010

Scott Rosenberg gives a crash course on the history of blogging and describes the unique role that WordPress has had over the years in improving the state of online publishing and in enabling millions of people to publish their thoughts—and the role of open source in the success of WordPress as a platform.

Video provided by Blaze Streaming Media.

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Event

WordCamp San Francisco 2010 19

Speakers

Scott Rosenberg 1

Tags

blogging 42
featured 181
history 3

Language

English 1677

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2 Responses to “Scott Rosenberg: WordPress – A Key Link in Blogging’s Evolutionary Chain”

  1. Matthew Smith

    I’m a WordPress user who used MT in 2004-5 and then for a long period after using WP (2005 to 2009).

    The MT crisis didn’t happen when Six Apart started charging; most people still got the product for free, after all. The crisis ran from 2004 to 2005 and was caused by spam – you pretty much couldn’t have comments on a MT site because you would just get flooded by spam, and many people chose not to get off Blogger because of the MT spam issue. I was forced off the web once because my host shut me down after a spam run on my TB script.

    WordPress 1.5 was the turning point, which introduced the two-level word-based spam blocking system, and it cut my spam hugely. I got off MT 3.1 onto WP 1.5 very readily.

    I went back to MT when version 3.2 came out and they had better anti-spam, and I thought their dynamic/static publishing choice was very useful as well (I published my main page and pages as static but my archive entries dynamic). I got feedback that said “MT sucks” and I could tell that WP had the momentum and Six Apart was concentrating on a corporate customer base; they’d lost their small bloggers. I wanted to use it to run multiple blogs, and it served that purpose quite well for a few years.

    Today, I use WP for my personal blog and Drupal for the other sites I had on my MT install.

  2. Robert Dares

    This is a must see for anyone interested in blogging. As the saying goes, “you cannot see where you are going unless you know where you have been.” I think Scott does a wonderful job explaining the history and evolution of blogging, along with delivering an excellent understanding of what it was and what it is today. This presentation will be interesting to blog writers and blog readers. I’m a relative newcomer to blogging, starting late in the game, around 2006, I missed out on the early days of blogging, so I truly appreciate the description Scott provides. I am currently a WordPress and was a Blogger user, and have found that since making the transition to WP it is everything people said about it and more, a much more versatile platform for your blog.

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