Sam Hotchkiss: WordPress as a Web App Framework

Published

November 9, 2012

This talk is about using WordPress to rapidly develop complex web apps. Using your own Singleton class in WP, separating logic from your views, different, powerful ways to use post types and taxonomies and user accounts, and examples of all of these things.

Slides: http://www.hotchkissconsulting.com/WPWebAppFramework.pdf

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Event

WordCamp Buffalo 2012 9

Speakers

Sam Hotchkiss 6

Language

English 1860

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3 Responses to “Sam Hotchkiss: WordPress as a Web App Framework”

  1. companyjuice

    This is an excellent presentation, Sam. I am a big believer in MVC and WordPress, so your argument has taught me some great lessons on code separation, using the Singleton, and using custom post types and plugins to manage classes and subclasses. Do you have any recommendations on WordPress Theme Frameworks that are structured in this way? (as to not re-invent the wheel) Great job Sam!

  2. David

    Really great talk. One question came up for me:

    You mentioned that querying based on meta data is a bad idea as its a big performance hit because the data isn’t indexed. When talking about how the post types on the solar site were related to each other you said you used meta data on each post type with a post id, so that they could be queried either way. Have you decided to just take the performance hit when relating post types to one another or is there a better way to do that?

  3. samhotchkiss

    Hey David– I think I responded to your question by email, but I just wanted to follow up publicly in case anyone else is having the same question/issue.

    What I did with GreenZu was to reference objects both ways in the meta. So your “project” post would have a custom meta item called “installer”, and the meta value there would be the installer post id. Your “installer” post would have a meta item called “project” which would, in turn, reference back to your installer post id. This way, regardless of which side of things you are on (you know the installer but not the project or vice-versa), you can figure out the other without resorting to poorly indexed information.

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