‘coding standards’ Videos

  • Elliot Taylor, Dave Green, Philip John: Lightning Session

    Elliot Taylor, Dave Green, Philip John: Lightning Session

    WordCamp London 2016Speakers: Elliot Taylor, Dave Green, Philip John

    June 5, 2016 — Why switching to WordPress Coding Standards will make you a better developer by Dave Green

    WordPress Coding Standards have been around for a while, yet many developers don’t write code with them, let alone know they exist. This was the case with me until September 2015 when I made the switch, and now I wish I’d dived in earlier! In this talk I’ll explain what they are, how they will help you write better, cleaner and more secure PHP code and why you should be using them for all WordPress projects.

    See the slides for Dave Green’s Talk Why Switching WordPress Coding Standards will make you a better Developer

    Be a better developer with code review by Philip John

    Code review may sound boring – as developers we want to *write* code, not read someone else’s. But if there’s one thing we must do as developers it’s continually learn, and code review is one of the best ways to do that. This talk will help you improve as a developer by talking about code review, what it is, and how it can improve the security, scalability and readability of your code.

    Building a SaaS product in WordPress by Elliot Taylor

    Last year Elliot put his focus from his agency business onto developing his product business YoGrow. The talk will discuss some of the benefits of moving to a product business and how YoGrow uses WordPress and WooCommerce as a foundation.

  • Michael Arestad: Godzilla CSS

    Michael Arestad: Godzilla CSS

    WordCamp US 2015Speaker: Michael Arestad

    December 13, 2015 — CSS in itself can be pretty difficult even when it’s just one person writing it on a project that is small in scope, but what happens when things get bigger? What naming conventions scale well? How do you work on it with a large team? What are the considerations needed for an open source project or really any project? What tools should be used? I’m going to be answering these and discussing a few other issues that may spring up when working on complex projects. I’m also going to talk about things that might drive you crazy, but don’t actually make an impact on your project.

    Presentation Slides »

  • Michael Toppa: 10 Tips for Clean Code

    Michael Toppa: 10 Tips for Clean Code

    WordCamp US 2015Speaker: Michael Toppa

    December 11, 2015 — We want code that is easy to understand, re-usable, and flexible. But we are always up against deadlines, so we rush, and end up with code that is messy, buggy, hard to maintain, and makes us go slower even though we’re trying to go faster.

    What is clean code? In this talk I’ll provide some answers to this question, and introduce you to 10 good habits that will help keep your code clean, such as the use of meaningful names for your variables and functions, and following the “Boy Scout Rule” (leave the code cleaner than you found it). I will even try to persuade you that using a lot of code comments is a sign that there are problems with your code. I’ll also discuss the particular challenges of applying some of these techniques in the WordPress environment.

    Presentation Slides »

  • Marius Veltan: Writing WordPress Code That’s Universal

    Marius Veltan: Writing WordPress Code That’s Universal

    WordCamp Belgrade 2015Speaker: Marius Veltan

    September 27, 2015 — I work in the client support team at Presslabs. On a daily basis, we come across issues that our clients face due to plugins and themes not being implemented according to WordPress standards, not being cache-friendly, not going by RFC recommendations, interfering with other plugins and the list goes on. The presentation will outline useful advice for writing WordPress code that is universal and does not necessitate adjusting after switching the theme, activating a plugin or moving to a different host.

  • Tom McFarlin: TL;DR - The Importance of Following the WordPress Coding Standards

    Tom McFarlin: TL;DR – The Importance of Following the WordPress Coding Standards

    WordCamp Atlanta 2015Speaker: Tom McFarlin

    April 17, 2015 — Sounds boring, right? Maybe. But how many times have you inherited code from someone else only to find yourself spending half the time on the project trying to figure out what was going on with the code. This is a point of frustration that developers have all felt at some point or another especially when inheriting projects from another agency or another group of programmers. But it doesn’t have to be this way! In fact, coding standards make it possible to actually minimize frustration both for us and our peers.

    Presentation Slides »

  • Konstantin Obenland: Inside Underscores

    Konstantin Obenland: Inside Underscores

    WordCamp Europe 2014Speaker: Konstantin Obenland

    February 17, 2015 — Underscores has become the go to tool for many theme developers, as their starting point when creating a new theme. It’s the semi-standard for the WordPress.org Theme Repository, and the origin for all themes launched on WordPress.com in the past three years. In this presentation we’re taking a look back at its origins, its successes, and most importantly, its most recent improvements. Including a feature update that supercharges Underscores.me, and will change how developers will interact with WordPress starter themes for years to come.

    Presentation Slides »

  • Josh Eaton: Teaming Up - Going from Solo Development to Working with a Team

    Josh Eaton: Teaming Up – Going from Solo Development to Working with a Team

    WordCamp Tampa 2014Speaker: Josh Eaton

    October 23, 2014 — There are many things that solo developers do that break down when placed in a team environment. We’ll walk through some of the best practices and things to keep in mind when going from freelance to working in a team.

    Presentation Slides »

  • Tabby Chapman: Functions.php And How To Quit It

    Tabby Chapman: Functions.php And How To Quit It

    WordCamp Vancouver 2014Speaker: Tabby Chapman

    September 15, 2014 — When developing a theme for a client, it’s super easy to throw all of the new functions and hooks into the theme’s functions.php file, wipe your hands, congratulate yourself for a hard day’s work and go have a beer. But, after a while, have you stopped to see the size of that functions.php file? It can be massive! It’s easy to create a large disorganized functions.php file with so many tutorials out there giving you little tips and tricks on hooks and doodads that you can add to the site to make it fancy. “Ohh! Look at this code that changes my background color based on weather patterns! I’ll just… put this… right… here… *drops in functions.php file* This session is about why you don’t want to fill up your functions.php file, the proper way to add code to your site, and why it’s proper for readability, security and extendability.

    Presentation Slides »

  • Japh Thomson: Code Quality Standards And Best Practices
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