‘hooks’ Videos

  • Monika Thon-Soun: Actions und Hooks im Theme. Super, total falsch, notwendiges Übel…

    Monika Thon-Soun: Actions und Hooks im Theme. Super, total falsch, notwendiges Übel…

    WordCamp Berlin 2015Speaker: Monika Thon-Soun

    February 7, 2016 — Es gibt Standard Hooks/Actions in den Themes. Es gibt viele Themes, die sehr viele Hooks anbieten und es gibt immer noch eine Gruppierung, die diese Hooks verallgemeinern mag und es gibt WP-Theme EntwicklerInnen, die dies total ablehnen. Vor-Nachteile. Diskussionsgrundlage. Meinungsbildung.

    Presentation Slides »

  • Thomas Maier: Understanding and Using Hooks

    Thomas Maier: Understanding and Using Hooks

    WordCamp Berlin 2015Speaker: Thomas Maier

    February 7, 2016 — After this session you will share my believe that hooks are the reason that WordPress is the number one cms in the world. You will know how to use them in order to extend core, plugins and themes and learn some smart tricks which you can use when adding hooks to your own code.

    Content in details:

    * why bother with hooks?
    * where hooks are used
    * elements of hook routines
    * basic functions and attributes
    * how core itself uses hooks
    * debugging hooks

    Presentation Slides »

  • Frank Staude: Hooks, Filter, Actions – Was zum Geier ist das?

    Frank Staude: Hooks, Filter, Actions – Was zum Geier ist das?

    WordCamp Cologne 2015Speaker: Frank Staude

    February 1, 2016 — Nicht „Was die Welt im Innersten zusammenhält“, sondern was uns WordPress möglichst weit öffnet, das sind die Hooks. Egal ob Theme oder Plugin, um etwas in WordPress zu ändern, zu erweitern, umzubauen und das ohne dass man direkt im WordPress Code ändert, dazu muss man verstehen was Hooks sind und wie diese Funktionieren. Egal ob man ein komplexes Plugin bauen möchte oder nur in seinem verwendeten Theme z.B. den Titel der Beiträge manipulieren möchte.

  • Josh Pollock: Five Events In The Life Of Every WordPress Request You Should Know

    Josh Pollock: Five Events In The Life Of Every WordPress Request You Should Know

    WordCamp Orlando 2015Speaker: Josh Pollock

    January 19, 2016 — WordPress is a magical system that turns any URL into a web page, dynamically. In this talk, aimed at beginning wizards, looking to develop new WordPress powers, we’re going to take a look at five major events in the transformation of a request to your site, into a web page.

    This talk is for new plugin developers, or those looking to increase their skills in the art of custom site development. It is designed to show you where to look when you need to change WordPress’ behavior to fit your specific needs and increase your ability to make use of WordPress hooks.

    Presentation Slides »

  • David Laietta: WordPress Hooks, Actions and Filters Oh My!

    David Laietta: WordPress Hooks, Actions and Filters Oh My!

    WordCamp NYC 2015Speaker: David Laietta

    December 23, 2015 — This talk will introduce you to WordPress actions, filters and hooks. We’ll cover what they are, how to use them and a few examples in action. Get ready to get more out of your site by powering up your themes and plugins with hook magic!

    Presentation Slides »

  • Aaron Brazell: Asynchronous Events

    Aaron Brazell: Asynchronous Events

    WordCamp Baltimore 2015Speaker: Aaron Brazell

    December 16, 2015 — Whenever a post is saved, a page is loaded, a comment is created or a template is loaded, WordPress fires off events that, as developers, we have loved and cherished. These events are hooks. While hooks have been the quintessential building blocks of WordPress for over a decade, they come with a cost. Often times, developers will hook functionality into the save_post event, for instance, to fire off a notification to an external service or perform some sort of background task. The more of these tasks are hooked into WordPress, the slower WordPress becomes.

    In this talk, I will show you how to alleviate these bottlenecks with asynchronous hooks – hooks that can be used to perform the exact same tasks, but not block the rest of WordPress from running. Through a library created by 10up’s Eric Mann and John Bloch for TechCrunch on WordPress VIP, the overhead of running actions can be reduced to a negligible amount.

    Presentation Slides »

  • Aaron Brazell: Asynchronous Events

    Aaron Brazell: Asynchronous Events

    WordCamp US 2015Speaker: Aaron Brazell

    December 11, 2015 — Whenever a post is saved, a page is loaded, a comment is created or a template is loaded, WordPress fires off events that, as developers, we have loved and cherished. These events are hooks. While hooks have been the quintessential building blocks of WordPress for over a decade, they come with a cost. Often times, developers will hook functionality into the save_post event, for instance, to fire off a notification to an external service or perform some sort of background task. The more of these tasks are hooked into WordPress, the slower WordPress becomes.

    In this talk, I will show you how to alleviate these bottlenecks with asynchronous hooks – hooks that can be used to perform the exact same tasks, but not block the rest of WordPress from running. Through a library created by 10up’s Eric Mann and John Bloch for TechCrunch on WordPress VIP, the overhead of running actions can be reduced to a negligible amount.

    Presentation Slides »

  • Evan Volgas: Things You Always Wanted To Know About WordPress (but were afraid to ask)

    Evan Volgas: Things You Always Wanted To Know About WordPress (but were afraid to ask)

    WordCamp US 2015Speaker: Evan Volgas

    December 10, 2015 — This talk will cover a few key “Aha” moments that you should have about the way WordPress works. We’ll talk about things like the template hierarchy, what’s going on in wp-config, where WordPress content is stored (the database vs. the file system), how posts and pages and custom post types are represented in the database, what folks are talking about when they talk about hooks and filters, and just generally review the “behind the scenes” mechanics of how WordPress works. We’ll also touch on a few “tricks of the trade” that you might not realize are out there (version control, staging sites, caching, Vagrant, and other fun tools to make development with WordPress just a little bit easier).

    This talk is aimed at designers and new developers who maybe have a few PHP tricks up their sleeves, but still haven’t figured out some of the details behind the scenes.

    If you’ve never edited functions.php and don’t know what it is, this probably isn’t a good talk for you just yet. If you’ve written a plugin or modified several .php files in your WordPress themes, this talk will probably be a bit too basic for you. If you’ve set up a child theme before and know what functions.php is, even if you haven’t really used it all that much, or even at all…. you’re probably the exact person who will get a lot out of this talk. And if that’s you, you should be able to walk away with a solid mental model of how WordPress works “behind the scenes” and be in a much better position to do development with it

    Presentation Slides »

  • James Bonham: There’s a Hook for That

    James Bonham: There’s a Hook for That

    WordCamp Denmark 2015Speaker: James Bonham

    December 7, 2015 — How can you change theme elements without creating child themes? How can you change plugin behaviour, or admin screens, without hacking the code? Through concrete real-world examples, I’ll show you how powerful actions and filters in WordPress are. If you are just beginning to learn to code, you can use them today with just a little PHP. If you are an experienced developer, you’ll get some insight into the typical use-cases I meet in my daily work, and maybe discover a new hook you didn’t know about.

    Presentation Slides »

  • Alex Mansfield: Building Extensible Themes With Hooks And Filters

    Alex Mansfield: Building Extensible Themes With Hooks And Filters

    WordCamp Portland 2015Speaker: Alex Mansfield

    November 22, 2015 — In this talk, I would like to explore a third option that uses the WordPress hook and filter system to find a comfortable middle ground. Using this method, the index.php file is used as starting point, with all of its output added via hooks and filters. Additional page templates simply add or remove actions from these hooks and filters. This methodology allows new templates to be created quickly and easily. Existing templates can also be modified on a per-use basis. To get the most out of this session, familiarity with WordPress Theme development and PHP are recommended. Knowledge of the WordPress hook/filter system will be helpful, but not required.

    Presentation Slides »

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