‘research’ Videos

  • Site Building Research Walkthrough/QandA

    Speakers: tinkerbelly, jarahsames

    March 23, 2019 — A walkthrough of the process and results from the site building user research study, followed by a Q&A session.

    Presentation Slides »

  • Teia Atkins: The Art of Stealing

    WordCamp D.C. 2017Speaker: Teia Atkins

    November 16, 2017 — My first year as a developer I felt like all I did was ask google to do my work for me. And now almost 5 years later I am a WordPress theme developer. The art of stealing explains how I began my career tinkering with pre written code to writing my own widgets, plugins and themes. Research, copy, paste and repeat was my methodology and one anybody can adopt.

  • Tammie Lister: Know Your Users

    WordCamp Torino 2017Speaker: Tammie Lister

    April 10, 2017 — How can you truly create an experience without knowing who you are creating it for? Why does so much get made without user research? Why do so many creating experiences not run user tests or engage with their users at any point? It isn’t a privilege of the wealthy agency or invested company. In this talk I’ll show why knowing your users matters and how you can start truly understanding them to make a better experience.

    Presentation Slides »

  • Hedren Sum: Using WordPress for Interdisciplinary Research

    WordCamp Singapore 2016Speaker: Hedren Sum

    October 6, 2016 — Research and scholarship are constantly evolving, becoming more collaborative and interdisciplinary. Supporting an interactive media-rich environment, WordPress is a versatile and easy to use platform to document and showcase interdisciplinary research that produces various types of research output.

    In this talk, we will be sharing about a digital archive developed for the Digital Intangible Heritage of Asia (DIHA) research cluster at NTU College of Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences.

  • Christine McGlade: User Experience Design and Business Innovation Mashups That Add Value

    WordCamp Toronto 2015Speaker: Christine McGlade

    January 17, 2016 — Education, Media, and Public Service are having their business and service delivery models disrupted. Sometimes, they haven’t fully internalized customer, student, or patient-centric business drivers, and sometimes they can’t justify budget line items related to user-centered design in this fiscally constrained environment.

    The result is that designers may need to “disguise” user-centered design methods behind other processes, and play it fast and loose with research methodologies to get the job done, while speaking to clients in a language they can both understand and get behind.

    In this session, Christine will illustrate how she has enlisted scenario planning, a facilitation methodology used in strategic business planning, as a tool to effectively create user personas and journey maps with simple and clear implications for adaptive content delivery. She will walk through how a traditional sales and marketing funnel became a powerful model to structure just-in-time content delivery for a healthcare client to progressively disclose information at exactly the right level of complexity for the user. And how she has used process design exercises to enlist active participation of clients in the UX design process that has helped them improve their service delivery.

    When we mashup user experience design practices with strategic planning and other, sometimes non-traditional business processes, we add value to organizations that goes well beyond the user experience. It helps them to be better at doing what they do.

    This session will be of interest to project leaders who want to better understand how to “sell” user experience design, as well as user experience designers who want to learn about new ways of approaching clients who may not understand what they do. Knowledge of standard user experience design methodologies is a must, as is a desire to learn about new ways to work with business leaders to help them derive more business value from their website or app design.

    Presentation Slides »

  • Mel Choyce and Courtney OCallaghan: WordPress, Open Source, and Museums – A Look at the Tools and Processes of Moving Our Collections Online

    WordCamp US 2015Speakers: Mel Choyce, Courtney O’Callaghan

    December 12, 2015 — As one of the first museums to fully digitize its collections and make them available online for the public, the Freer and Sackler Galleries, Smithsonian has embraced open source tools to empower its audience and staff to discuss and experience art. We are counting to leverage this open attitude by working with a small group within Automattic to research, plan, and design the Freer and Sackler site. As a team, we are developing custom plugins and code in-house that will be made available to the public and other cultural institutions on GitHub in hopes of furthering open source within the cultural environment.

    During the presentation, we will briefly discuss the democratization of art, review our planning and design process and how we are working to make sure the tools we develop are usable by others. We will finish with an open discussion on how cultural institutes can maximize their use of WordPress. While the case study will focus specifically on a visual arts museum, the lessons learned and tools used can be applied to any WordPress-driven website rollout.

  • Jordi Cabot: Looking at WordPress Through the Eyes of a Software Researcher

    WordCamp Europe 2015Speaker: Jordi Cabot

    July 14, 2015 — What does a researcher have to say about the WordPress source code and the community behind it? Join us on this talk on unusual “WordPress analytics” and see what we can learn, and improve!, from the way WordPress (and the plugin and theme ecosystem around it) is developed nowadays.

    Presentation Slides »

  • Dan Ariely: Predictably Irrational Behavior

    Speaker: Dan Ariely

    June 7, 2010 — WordPress.com VIP Dan Ariely stopped by the Automattic HQ in San Francisco to talk about what he’s learned in the process of his research into predictably irrational behavior, and how that knowledge and foresight can inform and better equip you.