Mark Howells-Mead: Modular Functionality – Organizing Your Code To Make WordPress Development Easier

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December 1, 2016

There are many resources for developers online which show how to code a WordPress Theme or a WordPress plugin. However, there are fewer resources which explain the necessity for, and advantages of, separating functionality between Themes and Plugins, planning development according to modular coding principles, and working on WordPress projects which go beyond the blog.

Touching on front end techniques most commonly known from programmers like Brad Frost, I’ll explain how to plan a development project for both front end and backend environments in an overview, using a recent real-world example of developing for both blogs and non-blog-type WordPress multisite installation.

My talk will provide a summarized insight into maintaining individual features through the use of your own Plugins, why it’s important to decide whether to add features to a Theme or via a Plugin, and the flexibility and organisation which modular coding brings.

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WordCamp Geneva 2016 18


Mark Howells-Mead 2


Front-end 20
functionality 4
resources 3


English 6219

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